Thanks to the lovely Robert Ross (https://twitter.com/RobertWRossEsq), I stumbled across this picture from 1990, the year of Dame Agatha’s centenary. To celebrate, Joan Hickson and David Suchet attended celebrations in Torquay, dressed as Miss Jane Marple and Monsieur Hercule Poirot, respectively.

Dame Christie was against the characters ever meeting in her narrative (after all, even if they had reason to meet, there’s very little chance they would like each other!). However, they do have various connections, proving they exist in the same world – as this lovely website points out.

Still, we can all savour the one time when our Poirot and Marple did get to know each other. (Excepting the encounter between Tony Randall and Margaret Rutherford in The Alphabet Murders, but let’s not discuss that…)

After spending much of 2013 watching oh, so many Agatha Christie adaptations, I decided to put together a list of all her novels and short story collections, and whether and when they have been adapted for film. I’ll attempt to keep this updated as new information comes to mind, particularly since it appears that 2017 will be the start of yet another new era of adaptations for the Queen of Crime. See below:

(list updated – September 2016)

(more…)

Basil Rathbone as Gerald in "Love From a Stranger"

One of Agatha Christie’s first forays into the world of film was 1937’s Love From A Stranger, adapted by Frances Marion from a play by Frank Vosper, based on Christie’s short story Philomel Cottage. Love From A Stranger is a wry,  well-conceived psychological thriller which proves that – even 75 years on – movies haven’t really changed.

(more…)

The ’80s were Christie’s most prosperous decade for adaptations until the 2000s, with Peter Ustinov‘s Poirot, Joan Hickson‘s Marple, Francesca Annis and James Warwick as Tommy and Tuppence, and assorted other film and TV adaptations. While Christie had been disappointed with the vast majority of adaptations in her lifetime, the 80s would see her work treated far more reverently, and thus lead to David Suchet‘s purist revival in the 90s. Yet, however obliquely, most of these would not have been possible without this pair of TV movies from the start of the decade.

(more…)

Film Review: “Murder She Said” (1961), “Murder at the Gallop” (1963), “Murder Most Foul” (1964) and “Murder Ahoy!” (1964)

with Margaret Rutherford (Miss Jane Marple), Stringer Davis (Mr. Stringer) and Charles ‘Bud’ Tingwell (Inspector Dermot Craddock)

(more…)

JOAN HICKSON’S MARPLE

Greetings, dear readers. Today, we’re heading back to the windy days of the 1980s, when David Suchet was just some guy who had played Inspector Japp, and Doctor Who was a dude in a ridiculous coat. Join me as we take a look at Joan Hickson’s celebrated turn as Miss Jane Marple.

(more…)

Joan Hickson as Miss Marple

Joan Hickson as Miss Marple

Dame Agatha Christie – whose novels and short story collections I’ve reviewed for this blog, as per my previous post – is the best-selling novelist of all time, having sold at least four billion copies of her novels in nearly every world language, and whose works and characters – from a sixty-year writing career – have been adapted into plays, radio plays, movies and television shows unceasingly since the 1920s . The only individual writer who rivals her for ubiquity is that paragon, Mr. William Shakespeare. In short, it’s fair to say she deserves writing about.

(more…)