This week, I’ve watched and reviewed all five major film adaptations of Dame Agatha’s And Then There Were None. Today, I’m awarding the winner in each category. So please join us…

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Welcome back to the final in my series of reviews of the various adaptations of And Then There Were None. Today it’s the most recent English-language film, 1989’s Ten Little Indians.

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Welcome back, as I continue reviewing the many adaptations of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Today, I’m looking at the bleak, faithful Russian adaptation, Desyat Negrityat (Ten Little Negroes).

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This week, we continue to explore the various film adaptations of Dame Agatha’s And Then There Were None. This time, we’re stepping back to 1974…

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Welcome back to the second day of my reviews of adaptations of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Yesterday, we saw the film that started it all. Today, I check out the 1965 movie, which takes the same script and lets it fly free…

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And Then There Were None – my favourite Agatha Christie novel – is the Dame’s most adapted, being the basis of stage plays, video games, TV films and – with its quintessential plot of people lured to an isolated location to be picked off one-by-one – a slew of parodies and loving homages (Family Guy did one of the most recent). But most notable are the five big-screen adaptations, made between 1945 and 1989. Yes, kind reader, I have sacrificed my social life to view all five this week, and so – over the next few days – I’ll be reviewing each of them, culminating in an ‘Awards’ post, in which I’ll nominate the best actor in each role, as well as the best screenplay, design, etc. Let’s start at the very beginning, shall we?

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 1. And Then There Were None (1939)

Ten people are lured to an isolated island and accused, by an unknown voice on a gramophone record, of murder. Then they start dying, one by one by one…

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