Other


It’s odd, really, given Dame Christie’s prominence and crossover popularity, that she hasn’t been more commonly filmed – at least on TV, if not the silver screen. Indeed, the late ’80s primarily saw her being adapted by the Americans (in updated versions of Murder is Easy and The Man in the Brown Suit) while the ’90s were given over almost exclusively to the Poirot and Marple series. The only modern British TV movie I’ve been able to track down and review until now was 2003’s Sparkling CyanideI would’ve thought that the novels would’ve been regular fodder for young writers armed with an ITV contract and two weeks’ filming time, but I suppose the Christie estate has other opinions. (And, it must be said, TV movies have a habit of updating the action to present-day, which is perfectly fine but might be challenging for some of Christie’s more class-conscious novels, and sometimes leads to the trashy feeling of the footballers and their wives in Sparkling Cyanide.) Today, however, I’m looking at that rare breed: a period TV film, adapted from a Christie novel, originally airing in the ’90s. Let’s take a look.

(more…)

Advertisements

Hi all! The exciting news that Poirot and Marple will be returning in 2012 inspired me to review one of the more interesting – if not entirely successful – Christie adaptations. Today, it’s 1995’s Innocent Lies.

(more…)

Hi folks, today I follow up my previous post to review the final five episodes of that little-known 1980s series The Agatha Christie Hour.

(more…)

Welcome back, as we hit the home stretch of my Christie film reviews. Today, it’s 2003’s TV film of Sparkling Cyanide.

(more…)

We’re nearing the end of my Agatha Christie film reviews, folks, so let’s have a look at another ’80s offering…

(more…)

Basil Rathbone as Gerald in "Love From a Stranger"

One of Agatha Christie’s first forays into the world of film was 1937’s Love From A Stranger, adapted by Frances Marion from a play by Frank Vosper, based on Christie’s short story Philomel Cottage. Love From A Stranger is a wry,  well-conceived psychological thriller which proves that – even 75 years on – movies haven’t really changed.

(more…)

Rue McClanahan and Stephanie Zimbalist in "The Man in the Brown Suit"

 Film review: “The Man in the Brown Suit” (1989)

with Stephanie Zimbalist (Anne Beddingfield), Ken Howard (Gordon Race), Edward Woodward (Sir Eustace Pedler), Rue McClanahan (Suzy Blair) and Tony Randall (Rev. Chichester)

written by Carla Jean Wagner

directed by Alan Grint

(more…)

Next Page »